We are taking a break from sending plants during June, July and August. Starting in September, it'll be possible to order plants again.

 
Agapanthus 'Ed Carman'

Agapanthus 'Ed Carman'

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$17.95   Strap-like leaves are green, with variegation running the length of the leaves that can be a golden-yellow to creamy white depending on season and garden conditions. The creamy variegation is echoed in the pure white flowers that come in heads of round clusters. Mature height of 2 or 2½ feet. Needs winter protection from frost. Ed Carman was widely known in California for his nursery's collection of unusual plants.
Alstroemeria 'Fabiana'

Alstroemeria 'Fabiana'

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$9.95   Growing ten to fourteen inches tall, this dwarf will flower a long four months in summer. Hardy in USDA zones 7b to 10, in colder climates it is very easy to overwinter indoors in a pot. It is a good plant for the Deep South, being tolerant of heat and humidity, although it would appreciate partial shade from the afternoon sun. The photo here does not do it justice. The leaves are a rich green edged in creamy white. And the large 2½-inch flowers are a matching creamy white, lightly spotted in yellow and dark red. When one shoot of flowers starts to fade we recommend gently pulling it up, out of the ground, to separate it from the rest of the plant. Doing this will not harm a plant, but allows more room for other flowering shoots to develop.
Anemanthele lessoniana

Anemanthele lessoniana

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$9.95   Poplularly known as pheasant-tail grass, this grows to a moderate height between 2 and 2½ feet. It is clump forming and does not run at the root. The habit is soft with the top of the grass splaying over a bit and gracefully arching. A major highlight of the plant is its russet colors (although young plants may start out green). Grow it in full sun and allow it to dry out between waterings. Native to New Zealand. Hardy to 10°F. Also known as Stipa arundinacea.
Arabis 'Variegata'

Arabis alpina subsp. caucasica 'Variegata'

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$6.95   Popularly known as rock cress, this unusual form has grayish-green leaves edged in cream that are evergreen, and can light up a garden year around. White, four-petaled half-inch wide flowers appear from early spring until the weather starts warming up. It needs only average soil. The soil having good drainage is particularly important. Doubly colorful with its flowers and foliage, it does good duty in a rock garden, as an edging plant, and planted in the crevices of a rock wall. Native to mountains in Europe, its can survive winter cold to USDA zone 3.
Aurinia 'Dudley Nevill Variegated'

Aurinia (Alyssum)
'Dudley Nevill Variegated'

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$8.95   An easy-to-grow, choice perennial that thrives in full sun and hot, exposed sites. It needs soil that is well drained and low in fertility because rich soil promotes sprawling, floppy growth. Rather than growing tall, it grows as an ever-widening mat. We recommend shearing it back lightly just after flowering. Clusters of small, bright apricot flowers cover the plant in spring. The leaves are gray-green edged in cream and are semi-evergreen. Hardy in USDA zones 3 to 7 in the eastern half of the U.S. and hardy in USDA zones 3 to 9 in the West.
Bergenia 'Tubby Andrews'

Bergenia 'Tubby Andrews'

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$11.95   This very cold hardy perennial has evergreen leaves of green and creamy yellow in summer. When cold weather arrives in fall the coloring changes to green and various tints of pink to darker red. The colder the days become, the richer the coloring. As warm weather returns the following spring, the colors revert to creamy yellow and green on the new leaves. Although the plant demands little attention from year to year, we divide it every few years because the variegation is most colorful on a younger plant and becomes more subdued after a few years on an older plant. Pink flowers show in spring, and again in fall. USDA zones 4 - 7 in the East, 4 - 9 in the West. More info, click here.
Calceolaria 'John Innes'

Calceolaria 'John Innes'

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$7.95   This calceolaria or slipperflower is a hybrid of two species that are native to colder, very southern parts of South America, and it can take quite severe cold, to USDA zone 5. The plant is very low at six inches and spreads slowly wider in a compact mass. The flowers are large in size, the size of a U.S. nickel, and bright yellow, with a few brown speckles on the flower. It likes both good drainage at the same time as not liking to fully dry out, in other words, ground that is moisture-retentive and quickly draining. If allowed to dry out too much in summer it will go dormant early. However just because it disappears above ground, don't think that it has died.
Campanula 'Chettle Charm'

Campanula persicifolia 'Chettle Charm'

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$8.95   Among bellflowers, this species is distinct for its tall, thin graceful habit and large bell-shaped flowers. This particular plant has flowers of white, beautifully edged in pale lavender. The height of the flower stems will be to thirty inches. And they make a superlative cut flower for your home. They are the perfect length for a vase and have a long life as a cut flower. Their subtle coloring compliments most any arrangement. Quite cold hardy, to USDA zone 4 (-30 to -20°F). Unfortunately it is not a plant for the deep South.
Campanula cochlearifolia 'Elizabeth Oliver'

Campanula cochlearifolia 'Elizabeth Oliver'

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$8.95   The double flowers of this elfin plant are small and a very light blue in color. Popularly called fairies thimbles, they show for many weeks in late spring in warmer climates, and in summer to fall in northern gardens. The plant's height is four inches, and it spreads modestly without over-crowding its neighbors. It is quite cold hardy, surviving winters where temperatures may drop to minus 20°F, or to minus 40°F if there is snow cover. It likes its roots kept evenly moist and cool. One way to achieve this is with shallow, wide rocks such as paving stones nestled into the soil, and planting this between them -- the soil under the stones stays moister and cooler than the soil in the open ground. The roots will spread out under the rocks and be happier. Campanula 'Elizabeth Oliver' was named for the daughter of a Mr. Bull, of Nottingham, England in the 1970's. The recommended way to propagate it is by dividing in spring or early summer.
Cortaderia 'Splendid Star'

Cortaderia selloana 'Splendid Star'

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$14.95   This dwarf golden-variegated pampas grass is a smaller version of pampas grass, not like the sort that grows so large that it can overwhelm a garden. And it is evergreen with narrow, arching leaves of green and creamy yellow, keeping its colors and being attractive all year around, in contrast to many other ornamental grasses than turn brown during winter. Its mature height is 2½ feet for the leaves and 3 to 4 feet for the seed plumes, which show at summer's end. Hardy in USDA zones 7 - 11. Cannot be sent to California. Limited quantity. More info, click here.
Cymbalaria muralis

Cymbalaria muralis 'Variegatus'

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$6.95   Known as Kenilworth ivy, this variegated form has leaves of green and a crisp, creamy white. It grows best in partial shade, or in locations with morning sunlight and shade in the afternoon. In mild climates, the foliage is evergreen to semi-evergreen. Does not grow well where summers have high heat and humidity. Growing moderately fast, it's easy to control its spread, so not considered invasive. Native to Asia and Europe. The tiny flowers are white and yellow, like miniature snapdragons, blooming from May to September. USDA zones 5 - 8.
Cytisus battandieri

Cytisus battandieri

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$12.95   This uncommon low tree has clusters of fragrant yellow floweres in early summer, bringing to mind the fruity scent of pineapples. The semi-evergeen foliage is silver-gray and attractive. It is very drought tolerant, and reaches a mature height of ten to twenty feet. When in flower, passers-by have a hard time guessing what it might be, it's so little seen here. For USDA zones 7 - 10. Other names it goes by are Moroccan broom or Argyrocytisus. Limited quantity.
Dianthus 'Chomley Farran'

Dianthus 'Chomley Farran'

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$11.95   Harking back to an old Flemish still-life, the fuchsia-red and violet-gray bi-colored flowers are large and fragrant. It is said to have appeared as a natural sport of a crimson border carnation in an Irish garden only a short few years ago. Each flower is about an inch and a half wide, fully double, on a stem of twelve inches. Hardy to USDA zone 6. Needs full sun and well drained soil. The bluish-gray leaves are large and evergreen. More info, click here.
Erodium x kolbianum'Natasha'

Erodium x kolbianum 'Natasha'

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$8.95   Small in scale, this plant has lacey, feathery gray leaves and pale pink flowers with purple veins and purple blotches on the upper two petals. Its height is two or three inches, with the flowers another two or three inches above. Grows easily in the sunny, open garden. Quickly draining soil is best for its longterm survival over winter. Hardy to USDA zone 5.
Farfugium japonica 'Argentea'

Farfugium japonicum 'Argenteum'

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$21.95   This grows to 2 feet tall, and even to 3 feet with ideal conditions in shade. The round leaves grow up to ten inches across, green with white creamy margins,and sometimes with a touch of pink. The leaves and stems can be lightly covered with downy fuzz, that rubs off when touched. Yellow daisy-like flowers show at the end of summer, often no taller than the leaves. Cold hardy to USDA zones 7 - 11. The large leaves may wilt on hot sunny days, and might not be a sign that the soil is dry. So if they wilt, check before watering. If the roots are kept too wet, they can rot. Also known as Farfugium japonicum 'Albovariegatum' and Ligularia tussilaginea subsp. argentea. The plants are grown in quart-sized pots. More info, click here.
Farfugium japonica 'Aureo-maculatum'

Farfugium japonica 'Aureo-maculatum'

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$8.95   Popularly known as leopard plant for its dark green leaves, spotted in yellow. The leaves are large and round, at eight to ten inches across, and glossy. In fall, yellow daisy-like flowers arise on stems about the same height as the leaves. They are eighteen to two feet tall. Needs shade during the afternoon. An ideal location would be a rich soil with partial shade. USDA zones 7 - 11, and possibly to zone 6 with protection. Where winters are colder, it is easily grown in a container and wintered indoors. Its leaves are evergreen and attractive all year round. Keep evenly moist.
Felicia ameloides 'Variegata

Felicia ameloides 'Variegata'

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$5.95   This is one of our favorite plants for container gardening because it blooms for such a long time and is so undemanding. A native of South Africa, it is commonly known as blue marguerite, a perennial that isn't frost hardy although it is easy to carry over winter by a sunny window. Reaching a height of 15 to 18 inches, with a wider spread, it responds well to shearing and pruning. The sky-blue flowers really stand out against the variegated leaves. Normal watering needs.
Fuchsia fulgens 'Variegata'

Fuchsia fulgens 'Variegata'

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$11.95   Rarely offered, this upright, rounded shrub grows to a size of three tall by four feet wide when planted outdoors. Its roots survive to USDA Zone 8 (and even to Zone 7 in favored locations). It has flowers from summer to fall colored in salmony pink, cream and orange-red, each flower being long and pendant. This species of fuchsia is native to Mexico. Older plants have tuberous roots resembling the roots of a dahlia. USDA hardiness zones 8 - 10.
Gazania ringens 'Variegata'

Gazania ringens 'Variegata'

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$6.95   Blooming continually all summer, from spring to fall, this golden daisy-like flower has flowers that are 2½ to 3 inches across. Its leaves are green and white. A tender plant, it can only be grown outdoors in the ground in USDA zones 9 to 11. In colder zones, it could be grown in a container and brought indoors for the winter, or simply replaced each spring with a new plant. So colorful in both its foliage and flowers, and so long blooming, that more gardeners should grow it. With a height up to just over a foot, it spreads wider, up to two feet. Average to low water needs.
Helleborus 'Janet Starnes'

Helleborus 'Janet Starnes'

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$11.95   Named for plantswoman Janet Starnes of Molalla, Oregon, who found the original in a batch of seedlings. The shining blue-green leaves are dusted with galaxies of white and dark green stars. New leaves, almost cream colored, are fringed with pink; older leaves darken to a marbled green. Clouds of soft green flowers in early sping. Blooms on the previous year's growth. The flowers are showy, but the main attraction is the unusual foliage. Cold hardy to -10°F
Iris foetidissima 'Variegata'

Iris foetidissima 'Variegata'

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$11.95   Prefering shade over sun, the dark green leaves irregularly striped in creamy white will turn yellow if planted in too much light. They reach a height of eighteen inches. Flowering is infrequent on this variegated plant, the flowers being pale lilac and amber. The colorful leaves are evergreen and decorate the garden all year. In gardens where winter temperatures drop into the teens Fahrenheit, the leaves may be damaged and need to be cut back in late winter. Cold hardy to USDA zone 7.
Iris japonica 'Aphrodite'

Iris japonica 'Aphrodite'

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$8.95   From Japan, this woodland iris needs shade. Pale, creamy blue flowers, several to a stem open in spring. They are fringed and there are spots of orange and yellow dotted at the base of the falls. They are an inch to an inch and a half across and have something of an exotic look to them, a bit orchid-like. Plants will spread moderately by thin rhizomes. The leaves are equally streaked in green and cream. Height of the plant is ten to twelve inches. Hardy in USDA zones 7-9, although it can grow as cold as zone 5 in a protected location.
Iris pallida 'Argentea Variegata'

Iris pallida 'Argentea Variegata'

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$8.95   Attractive whether in bloom or out of bloom because of its broad, sword-like leaves that are striped in green and white. They are semi-evergreen. The light lavender flowers show in late spring, and are sweetly fragrant. Thrives in any well drained soil, growing well even in heavy clay. USDA zones 4 - 9, and to zone 3 with protection.
Iris pallida 'Variegata'

Iris pallida 'Variegata' ('Aureovariegata')

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$8.95   The heavenly fragrance of these flowers is reason enough to grow this iris, reminding some folks of grape soda or possibly vanilla. The flowering season is late spring to early summer. The flowers are a light lavender. Flower stems to 3 feet. Leaves to about 2 feet, and are striped in green and a light golden-cream. When planting, set a plant high enough in the ground so the top of the thickened rhizome is not completely buried by earth. And to flower well, more sun than shade is necessary. Hardy from USDA zones 4 - 9, and to zone 3 with protection.
Lewisia columbiana var. rupicola

Lewisia columbiana var. rupicola

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$7.95   This lewisia is smaller in scale than other lewisias, with tight clusters of evergreen leaves, 1 - 3 inches long and ¼-inch wide. Twelve-inch tall sprays of small, open-faced flowers show for weeks in spring and early summer, colored in white with magenta/purple edging and striping. This is a drought-tolerant succulent. Be sure to plant in well drained earth. USDA zones 4 - 8.
Lewisia columbiana var. rupicola 'Saddle Mountain Form'

Lewisia columbiana var. rupicola 'Saddle Mountain Form'

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$7.95   Very compact rosettes of small evergreen leaves form a low, ground-hugging mat. Clusters of many beautiful rose-purple flowers show on stems of 5 to 6 inches tall in mid-to-late spring and into summer. Saddle Mountain is located in the coastal mountains northwest of Portland, Oregon. USDA zones 4 - 8.
Lewisia cotyledon var. howellii

Lewisia cotyledon var. howellii

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$9.95   Found in the wild at 5600-ft in the Klamath Range of California. It's a low plant, and in spring there are very low, short stemmed clusters of creamy flowers with pink veins. USDA zones 4 - 8.
Manfreda (Agave) 'Spot'

Manfreda (Agave) 'Spot'

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$9.95   “deciduous agave” -- A hybrid between Manfreda virginica and Manfreda maculosa (“Texas tuberose”), this plant has gray-green leaves speckled with sizable spots of reddish brown. It is cold hardy USDA zone 5 (-20°F) when situated where the soil drains freely. Older plants, in time, will grow into a thick clump of shoots connected at their roots. The leaves grow to a height of 12 to 15 inches, with taller flower stems to 4 feet.
Melianthus major

Melianthus major

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$10.95   This plant grows into a woody shrub about five feet in height, having large fingered, grayish or silvery leaves with a zig-zag pattern to the leaf margins as though they were cut with large pinking shears. Survives our winters although sometimes the stems are killed back in winter and must resprout from the roots. On warm summer days the rubbed leaves have a peanut butter-like scent. Flowers here in early summer with clusters of reddish stems and green blooms above the leaves. Cold hardy to USDA zones 7 - 11. Plants that survive in zones 7 and 8 may freeze to the ground, however will resprout from the roots in spring. If a young plant looks like it has frozen, do not be too quick to dig it out. You might discover signs of life and wish you hadn't disturbed it.
Parochetus communis

Parochetus communis

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$8.95   Known as both blue oxalis and shamrock pea, this is native to the mountains of Africa and Asia. It is low at 1 to 3 inches tall and spreads widely to a couple of feet or more. The green leaves often have a circle pattern of dark red. The cobalt blue flowers are unbelievable at first sight. Flowers are produced for a long season. Plant it outdoors in the spring to give it a good start, and it will survive over winter to USDA zone 8b.
Pelargonium 'Snowy Nutmeg'

Pelargonium x fragrans 'Snowy Nutmeg'

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$5.95   Pelargonium x fragrans 'Snowy Nutmeg' has green leaves irregularly splashed with cream that are gloriously scented. A small-scale scented-leaf geranium, its leaves are up to about an inch wide. It isn't reliably frost hardy, although it may survive outdoors in USDA zones 7 and 8 in a protected location such as under the eaves of a house. White flowers bloom thru summer.
Primula 'Blue Sapphire'

Primula 'Blue Sapphire'

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$6.95   The leaves are low and partially evergreen. The flowers begin to appear in early spring. For us they start in late February and continue on well into summer. When planted in just the right spot they can flower here year around. They would prefer a rich soil, light shade and slightly more moisture than average when they can get it, however will grow well in full sun and with less than perfect conditions. 'Blue Sapphire' has fully double flowers, two or three per stalk, of a rich blue that are often thinly rimmed in silver. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 9, zone 5 with protection.
Primula 'Lilian Harvey'

Primula 'Lilian Harvey'

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$6.95   Lovely double fuschia-pink blossoms, flowering from March to May. She grows six to eight inches tall and six to ten inches wide. The person, Lilian Harvey (1906 - 1968), was a German-British actress and singer. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 8, also to zone 5 with protection, and to zone 9 along the West Coast.
Primula 'Mark Viette'

Primula 'Mark Viette'

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$6.95   This primrose starts out purple when it is in bud, and even as the flower opens it is still purplish. Only gradually does it turn to ruffled, double flowers of hot pink, a pink leaning towards violet, with a pencil-line edging of cream. As with other primroses, 'Mark Viette' grows best in ground that is lightly moist, and in partial shade. Dividing plants of it every couple of years is recommended to keep the plants healthy and blooming well. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 8, also to zone 5 with protection, and to coastal areas of zone 9.
Primula 'Penumbra'

Primula 'Penumbra'

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$6.95   Multicolored flowers of black with a wide white edging and golden eyes are showy and very bright. The flowers come in clusters atop four-inch stems in spring and again in fall. The leaves are light green and can be evergreen depending on the severity of the winter. USDA zones 6 to 9, to zone 5 with protection. With good snow cover it is routinely carried over winter in zones 3 and 4.
Primula 'Sue Jervis'

Primula 'Sue Jervis'

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$6.95   Flowers of light, candy pink are double. As a flower ages, her petals lighten to a creamy pink. For growing conditions, dappled shade and damp but well-drained soil is recommended. To encourage vigorous growth and prolific flowering, dividing the double primroses every year or two is best, and adding some compost or organic fertilizer to the soil.
Primula 'Tie Dye'

Primula 'Tie Dye'

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$6.95   With large blue and white flowers, the name of this primrose is appropriate for its unique look. Four-inch high stems carry clusters of flowers in spring and again in autumn. The leaves are light green and can be evergreen depending on the severity of the winter. USDA zones 6 to 9, to zone 5 with protection, and even to zone 3.
Primula sieboldii 'Snowflake'

Primula sieboldii 'Snowflake'

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$9.95   Blooming from early April to late May, the pure white flowers of 'Snowflake' have lacey margins. The flowers come in clusters on stems up to about nine inches high. It doesn't like too much direct sunlight, but thrives in filtered shade. A humusy soil that is rich in leaf mold is much to its liking. Don't be surprised to see it going dormant early, before the end of summer. This is normal for it and doesn't mean that it won't return to be bigger and better the following year. We advise you to make a note of where it's planted so that you won't lose track. Slowly growing into a clump, it also will spread wider into a colony. It may even migrate short distances because new plants can form on its spreading roots. Hardy in USDA zones 5 - 8 (and to Zone 9 along the coastal regions of the West).
Rhodanthemum hosmariensis

Rhodanthemum hosmariensis

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$7.95   (roe-'dan-the-mum) Originally from Morocco, this is a superb flower and foliage plant for a sunny site, with pristine white daisies that is seldom without bloom from spring to autumn. In milder parts of California it even flowers through winter. The silvery leaves are evergreen and attractive at all seasons. Reaches a size of 8 to 10 inches high, by 24 inches wide. Give it ground that drains well. Otherwise, very low-maintenance and easy to grow. Especially nice when added to a large container of sun-loving flowers. Also it is attractive drapping over a rock wall or as an edging plant, among other possibilites. Tolerates drought very well. Hardy to +15°F.
Rosa 'Clementina Carbonieri'

Rosa 'Clementina Carbonieri'

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$9.95   A tea rose, this lovely, low bush has fragrant ever-blooming flowers of pink, with the reverse sides of the petals painted in yellow and salmon. Its height is approximately three feet tall, with a two-foot width. And it has few thorns. First registered in 1913. Cold hardy to 0°F.
Rosa rubrifolia

Rosa glauca (rubrifolia)

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$9.95   Also known as Rosa rubrifolia, it is notable for its unusual grey-green foliage and purplish-red stems. Flowers are pink and about one inch wide. The clusters of small red fruit are colorful later in the year. Rosa glauca is a densely spreading bush, 5 to 6 feet tall. Its thorns are small, more like prickles. Native to mountains of southern Europe, it can take much cold, growing in USDA zones 2 to 9. Good uses would be grown as a free-standing shrub, or tied to a trellis or fence to be trained as a small climber. Doesn't need much sunlight to grow well, growing well in a semi-shady spot in your garden. Disease resistant and undemanding. Its fruit pesists into winter to offer food for birds.
Rosa 'Mutabilis'

Rosa 'Mutabilis'

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$9.95   Flowering all summer long, this semi-evergreen shrub rose grows to four feet tall in northern climates and to six feet tall in southern climates. Young shoots are purplish and the new leaves are coppery. Its flowers change color as they age — the unopened buds are apricot-pink, then open to buff, next becoming a mixture of apricot, rose, and crimson. The flowers are unscented and each is two to three inches across. Sometimes called the butterfly rose, it was brought back from China during the Victorian era. Do not prune it hard, but only enough to keep it within bounds or to remove dead wood. Winter hardy to USDA zone 6.
Saxifraga stolonifera 'Harvest Moon'

Saxifraga stolonifera
'Harvest Moon'

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$9.95   'Harvest Moon' prefers more shade than sun, however if grown in too much shade the leaves will be more green than golden. So a fair degree of bright sunlight is necessary. You will notice that the higher, more exposed leaves will be more golden, whereas the lower, more shaded leaves will be darker and greener. It has tiny white flowers on stems twelve to fifteen inches tall in late spring to early summer. Despite the fact that it does spread by runners, it is one of the easiest plants to keep under control because the plants are so often delicately rooted into the ground. It tolerates dry gound well, and would be a good choice for a groundcover in dry shade. When grown in a pot let the soil dry out considerably more than you would most potted plants. When grown in a pot, if its soil is kept constantly wet, the roots will rot. USDA zones 5 - 9. This plant thrives on neglect.
Saxifraga stolonifera 'Tricolor'

Saxifraga stolonifera
'Tricolor'

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$9.95   Lightly hairy evergreen leaves are edged in cream with pink highlights. This perennial is hardy from USDA zones 5 to 9. One of its common names is mother of thousands, referring to the many baby plants that will grow from it on runners. Although others recommend growing it in moist but well drained soil, our experience suggests that is it better to let the soil dry out considerably between infrequent waterings. The rocky cliffs of Japan and China are its native home. Delicate clusters of small white flowers rise to 15 inches in spring into summer. Limited quantity.
Tanacetum haradjanii

Tanacetum haradjanii

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$7.95   Deeply cut, feathery leaves of silvery white are stunning on this perennial. We rarely if ever see flowers on it. This likes well drained soil and more sun than shade. Winter hardy to USDA zone 6. Mature height will be six inches with a width of twelve inches in a couple of years.
Tellima 'Forest Frost'

Tellima 'Forest Frost'

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$8.95   Known as fringe cups, this plant is semi-evergreen and cold hardy to USDA zone 5 (-20°F). The color of the leaves is green in summer and an amazingly bright red in winter. The height of the foliage will be a foot to a foot and a half, with taller green flowers that turn to red on stems to 30 inches. Does well in dry shade, also growing with more light.
Veronica gentianoides 'Variegata'

Veronica gentianoides 'Variegata'

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$8.95   Its lustrous, green leaves have creamy marbling. It is semi-evergreen and low to the ground, growing into a slowly widening clump that carries short spires of beautifully blue flowers in early summer. To grow well it needs soil that will not dry out during the heat of summer. And filtered light, or placed where it receives morning sun only. USDA zones 4 - 9 in the West, zones 4 - 7 in the East.
Viola odorata 'Clive Groves'

Viola odorata 'Clive Groves'

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$8.95   Its small, sweetly fragrant flowers bloom very early in the year. The scent is strong and you do not have to wonder if your sniffer is working with this flower. The color is a deep, rich purple. A plant of this will send out short runners that become new plants. And within a season or two, one plant becomes a small colony.
Viola odorata 'Fair Oaks'

Viola odorata 'Fair Oaks'

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$8.95   Introduced by Canyon Creek Nursery in 1986, to quote their catalog, “originating in the garden of my family home, the color of this violet, unlike any other, is a delicate shade of lilac-pink. The medium sized flowers on long stems are extremely fragrant. The seeds come true and spread very rapidly making a nice woodland ground cover.” USDA zones 3 - 9.
Viola odorata 'Lianne'

Viola odorata 'Lianne'

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$8.95   The small flowers are purplish-bluish. This viola will spread wider in two ways, both by seeding itself about and also from runners that it sends out four to eight inches. It does not grow tall, reaching a short height of 2 - 4 inches.
Viola odorata 'Lydia Groves'

Viola odorata 'Lydia Groves'

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$8.95   The flowers of this are a light, candy pink that are sweetly scented. In 1989 it was selected in England by Clive Groves and named for his mother. The flowers have a single row of petals. The heart of the flower is a creamy white. It blooms very early in spring and again in fall. Its height is three to six inches.
Viola odorata 'Lydia's Lark'

Viola odorata 'Lydia's Lark'

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$9.95   This is a seedling of 'Lydia Groves,' that's a darker pink, with a bit of lavender-purple on the reverse side of the petals. The heart of the flower is a creamy white. It blooms in early spring and again in fall, with a height of three to six inches. Sweetly fragrant.
Viola odorata (mauve)

Viola odorata (mauve)

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$8.95   This flower is a grayish violet, very fragrant and low growing. It blooms early in the year, and often will rebloom as the days become cooler at the end of summer. Light shade is recommended. Adding some well rotted compost when planting is helpful. Young plants should be watered regularly to get them off to a good start. Once established, plants do not need more than average moisture. USDA zones 3 - 9. Sweet violets have been cultivated in gardens for a long time, not only for their beauty and fragrance, but also for their medicinal properties. They contain the glycoside of salicylic acid, which has been used for the synthesis of aspirin. It is no wonder herbalists have prescribed an infusion of this plant for treating headaches, migraines and insomnia.
Viola odorata 'Reid's Crimson Carpet'

Viola odorata 'Reid's Crimson Carpet'

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$8.95   Introduced by Canyon Creek Nursery in 1998, to quote their catalog's description of 'Reid's Crimson Carpet,' “this makes a compact carpet of tidy, deep green foliage. In spring this mat is covered with brilliant crimson flowers which are nicely scented. Named for our son, Reid, who thinks we should have patented this violet to help towards his college fund. He might be right.”
Viola odorata ssp. sulfurea

Viola odorata ssp. sulfurea

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$8.95   Our original plant of this came from Lamb Nurseries in Spokane, Washington. It has flowers of apricot with a single row of petals. For many years we thought this had no scent, although more recently we noticed a very light fragrance to a plant in flower in one of our greenhouses. According to Roy Coombs in his book, Violets, the History & Cultivation of Scented Violets, this is probably a distinct species rather than a subspecies of V. odorata. Dating from 1896 in France. USDA zones 3 - 9.
Viola odorata 'Duchesse de Parme'

Viola odorata 'Duchesse de Parme'

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$11.95   'Duchesse de Parme' originated in 1870 and is said to be the easiest Parma violet to grow. In America it has been one of the easier Parmas to find in recent years. Its fully double flowers are a violet blue, with creamy white closer to the center. It makes a charming tussie mussie or petite bouquet, with its six-inch stems. Its season is late winter into early spring, and again in early fall. Survives cold down to about +20°F.
Viola odorata 'Mrs. David Lloyd George'

Viola odorata 'Mrs. David Lloyd George'

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$19.95   A semi-double lavender flower with a center rosette of white, that is fragrant and with long stems. Limited quantity. This rare violet is named for Dame Margaret Lloyd George (1864 - 1941), who was a Welsh humanitarian and one of the first seven women magistrates appointed in Britain in 1919, and also the wife of a British Prime Minister. Survives winter's cold to about +20°F.