kniphofias

Kniphofia by season

early summer:
   albescens
   Coral
   Shenandoah

July and August:
   Apricot Souffle
   Bee's Sunset
   Lemon Queen
   Toffee Nosed

late summer to fall:
   Green Jade
   Percy's Pride
   rooperi
   Tower of Gold

winter blooming:
   Christmas Cheer
   sarmentosa
Kniphofia albescens

Kniphofia albescens

$16.95   The flowers are a pastel light green at the top and creamy white below. With age all of the florets become a delicate, creamy yellow. Produced from divisions, not from seeds, so they will all match. Blooming during early summer with flower stems of 3 to 3½ feet high. Cold hardy to USDA zone 7, and zone 6 with winter protection.
Kniphofia 'Apricot Soufflé'

Kniphofia 'Apricot Soufflé'

$11.95   Flowering in July, this softly colored orange/apricot and creamy yellow flower reaches a height of two and a half feet. The soft and rich colors of 'Apricot Soufflé' mix beautifully with lavender, blue and white flowers.
Kniphofia 'Bee's Sunset'

Kniphofia 'Bee's Sunset'

$10.95   (also going by the name of 'Shining Sceptre') A vigorous plants that has orange-gold flowers and blooms July - August. Grows to three feet in height, or slightly more.
Kniphofia 'Christmas Cheer'

Kniphofia 'Christmas Cheer'

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15.95   'Christmas Cheer' has been growing here outdoors without any protection for twenty years, surviving winter temperatures down to +6°F. And to repeat, 'Christmas Cheer' received no covering or other protection during these twenty years. So it survives temperatures below freezing quite well. However, the flowers cannot take a frost, and because they bloom during December, January and February there is no practical reason to grow this red-hot poker unless you live where winters are mild. Of course winter weather varies from year to year, and some winters we get a warm spell when the flowers bloom well outdoors. It is a hot orange-red, with older, lower flowers turning to light yellow as they age. Height will be 2 to 3 feet.
Kniphofia 'Coral'

Kniphofia 'Coral'

$11.95   Blooming in early summer, the coral colored flowerheads reach a height of three to four feet. Very robust and surviving a greater degree of cold, to USDA zone 5.
Kniphofia 'Green Jade'

Kniphofia 'Green Jade'

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$14.95   This famous plant flowers towards the end of summer with a height of three to four feet, in a color of lime green. Americans have read about it in British gardening magazines for years and have only recently been able to find it on our side of the pond. USDA zones 6 - 10.
Kniphofia 'Lemon Queen'

Kniphofia 'Lemon Queen'

$10.95   Flowering in July and August, its colors are a pure lemon yellow. It is extraordinarily strong growing. USDA zones 6 - 10, and zone 5 with protection over winter.
Kniphofia 'Percy's Pride'

Kniphofia 'Percy's Pride'

$11.95   The large, long heads of flowers are in lime green and the palest of yellows, and are much anticipated here in late summer. This is very vigorous. The height of the flower stems is three to four feet. USDA zones 6 - 9, and to zone 10 in the West.
Kniphofia rooperi

Kniphofia rooperi

$10.95   With flowers showing in late summer to fall, this species, rooperi is tall at four feet with large flowerheads that are globe shaped. USDA zones 7 - 9, and to zone 10 in the West.
Kniphofia sarmentosa

Kniphofia sarmentosa

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$12.95   Truly winter flowering, plants in the ground have survived well with temperatures down to +6°F. It is best grown where winters are mild, such as the Deep South or California. Plants spread by runners, which is characteristic of only a few torch lilies. Its colors are coral-red turning to creamy yellow as they age, the overall shape of the flower spike tapering sharply at the top end. Height of the flowers is 18 to 24 inches.
Kniphofia 'Shenandoah'

Kniphofia 'Shenandoah'

$14.95   This was offered by a nursery located in the Appalachian foothills of Virginia that we picked up about twenty years ago. It is a plant that can take a greater degree of winter cold. It blooms in late spring to early summer. The flowers are orange-red and yellow, with a height of three to four feet. It grows robustly. USDA zones 6 to 10, and to zone 5 with a covering over winter.
Kniphofia 'Toffee Nosed'

Kniphofia 'Toffee Nosed'

$12.95   The flowers of this are cream, darkening at the top a light toffee color. The flower spikes are lower than most red-hot pokers, reaching a height of two feet. Grows as a slowly widening clump, that in several years will become long-blooming, beginning in June or early July and continuing for most of the summer. USDA zones 7 - 10. It will survive in colder climates if you give it winter protection such as covering with a mulch or a large basket turned upside down and kept from blowing away, with a large rock on top during winter's cold.
Kniphofia 'Tower of Gold'

Kniphofia 'Tower of Gold'

$12.95   Grown and named by Luther Burbank, this is a large flowered plant appearing near summer's end. Colors are a golden yellow with a light touch of orange/red at the top. Its height is two and a half to three feet. USDA zones 7 - 9, and to zone 10 in the West.
Lewisia 'Little Peach'

Lewisia 'Little Peach'

$8.95   The peach flowers of this succulent are lightly blushed with pink and yellow, that bloom in mid-spring and a second time in late summer. 'Little Peach' is evergreen and grows 4 to 6 inches high and 6 to 8 inches wide. Its soil needs excellent drainage, such as grown in a clay pot that is allowed to dry out between waterings, or planted in a rock wall, a gravel scree or alpine bed. Not a plant for the South, in hot summer climates it does better with partial shade. A hybrid of Lewisia longipetala x cotyledon. USDA zones 5 - 8, and zones 9 and 10 in the West.
Linaria 'Natalie'

Linaria 'Natalie'

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$6.95   'Natalie' has masses of tiny lavender flowers for much of summer and is long lived. She is easily grown in average soil that is well drained, being drought tolerant once established and requiring no special attention. Her height is eighteen to thirty inches. The stems are very thin and her leaves are small. The overall appearance is lacey and delicate. Hardy to USDA zones 5 - 8. This plant is non-seeding, an advantage over other Linarias.
Manfreda (Agave) 'Spot'

Manfreda (Agave) 'Spot'

$9.95   “deciduous agave” -- A hybrid between Manfreda virginica and Manfreda maculosa (“Texas tuberose”), this plant has gray-green leaves speckled with sizable spots of reddish brown. It is cold hardy USDA zone 5 (-20°F) when situated where the soil drains freely. Older plants, in time, will grow into a thick clump of shoots connected at their roots. The leaves grow to a height of 12 to 15 inches, with taller flower stems to 4 feet.
Melianthus major

Melianthus major

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$10.95   This plant grows into a woody shrub about five feet in height, having large fingered, grayish or silvery leaves with a zig-zag pattern to the leaf margins as though they were cut with large pinking shears. Survives our winters although sometimes the stems are killed back in winter and must resprout from the roots. On warm summer days the rubbed leaves have a peanut butter-like scent. Flowers here in early summer with clusters of reddish stems and green blooms above the leaves. Cold hardy to USDA zones 7 - 11. Plants that survive in zones 7 and 8 may freeze to the ground, however will resprout from the roots in spring. If a young plant looks like it has frozen, do not be too quick to dig it out. You might discover signs of life and wish you hadn't disturbed it.
Mukdenia 'Crimson Fans'

Mukdenia 'Crimson Fans'

$10.95   Clusters of small, white flowers appear on this groundcover in early spring before the new leaves appear. The leaves are more the show than the flowers. The shiny, fingered leaves are fan-shaped emerging a bronze-green, that in strong light turn to crimson at the edges. In fall, the green centers turn to gold. Height will be twelve inches on an established plant. This likes partial shade and evenly moist ground throughout summer, and grows better across the cooler, more northerly part of North America. It is a Japanese hybrid of a species that is native to China and Korea. With age the plant will spread out from thick rhizomes. Cold hardy to USDA zone 4. Also known as Aceriphyllum.
Nepeta 'Forncett Select'

Nepeta nervosa 'Forncett Select'

$7.95   Growing to a size of ten inches tall, this bushy perennial flowers from June through August, bringing welcome color to the late summer garden. Its flowers are a rich violet-blue. Hardy to USDA zones 5 - 9, this species is native to Kashmir. It likes well-drained soil in sun.
Parochetus communis

Parochetus communis

$8.95   Known as both blue oxalis and shamrock pea, this is native to the mountains of Africa and Asia. It is low at 1 to 3 inches tall and spreads widely to a couple of feet or more. The green leaves often have a circle pattern of dark red. The cobalt blue flowers are unbelievable at first sight. Flowers are produced for a long season. Plant it outdoors in the spring to give it a good start, and it will survive over winter to USDA zone 8b.
Pelargonium 'Snowy Nutmeg'

Pelargonium x fragrans 'Snowy Nutmeg'

$5.95   Pelargonium x fragrans 'Snowy Nutmeg' has green leaves irregularly splashed with cream that are gloriously scented. A small-scale scented-leaf geranium, its leaves are up to about an inch wide. It isn't reliably frost hardy, although it may survive outdoors in USDA zones 7 and 8 in a protected location such as under the eaves of a house. White flowers bloom thru summer.
Phlox glaberrima 'Triple Play'

Phlox glaberrima 'Triple Play'

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$7.95   The leaves are green and cream, tinged in pink during fall and winter. A low and spreading plant, the lavender-pink flowers are taller at 4 to 8 inches and bloom heavily in late spring with a second bloom at the end of summer. And they are favorites of hummingbirds and butteflies. Cold hardy from USDA zone 4 to 8, Phlox glaberrima is native from Wisconsin south to Florida. If several are planted as a group, space them about 8 to 10 inches apart. (Plant patent 21,329)
Phyteuma scheuchzeri

Phyteuma scheuchzeri

$7.95   Not frequently offered at nurseries, the common name of this is horned rampion. It is a close relative of bellflowers, Campanula, although the flowers are quite different in appearance from bellflowers. Each flowerstem holds a ball-shaped cluster of violet-blue flowers, and long, spiky bracts, that have a light, dainty character. Horned rampion hails from the mountainous Alps of Europe. Hardy to USDA zones 6 to 9, and to zone 5 with protection. Its flowering season is early to mid summer, and blooms at a height of eight to ten inches.
Podophyllum pleianthum

Podophyllum pleianthum

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$12.95   The common name for this is Chinese mayapple. It has large, shiny rounded leaves from one to two feet tall. They may grow to the size of a large dinner plate and are very decorative. Richly dark red flowers bloom on the leaf-stems underneath the leaves. The flower buds do not open all at once, but one after another. An older plant will have many buds so that the flower season lasts for quite some time. This plant needs shade all day long to be happy, because direct sunlight will burn any part of the leaf that it touches. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 8, and to zone 9 along the Pacific Coast. More info, click here.
auricula primroses

Primula auricula -- to go to a separate page offering them, click here.

Primula 'Blue Sapphire'

Primula 'Blue Sapphire'

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$6.95   The leaves are low and partially evergreen. The flowers begin to appear in early spring. For us they start in late February and continue on well into summer. When planted in just the right spot they can flower here year around. They would prefer a rich soil, light shade and slightly more moisture than average when they can get it, however will grow well in full sun and with less than perfect conditions. 'Blue Sapphire' has fully double flowers, two or three per stalk, of a rich blue that are often thinly rimmed in silver. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 9, zone 5 with protection.
Primula 'Butter Yellow'

Primula 'Butter Yellow'

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$6.95   This fully double flower has petals of sunny yellow. The height of a plant will be six inches. It likes a humus-rich soil in partial shade. Withstanding winter cold to USDA zone 5 with protection, it will survive from year to year as a true perennial in regions where summers are not humid and hot. In other words this is more of an annual in the South. And the flowers are fragrant.
Primula 'Belarina Cream'

Primula 'Double Cream'

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$6.95   This fully double primrose has petals of light cream. The height of a plant will be six inches. It likes a humus-rich soil in partial shade. Withstanding winter cold to USDA zone 5 with protection, it will survive from year to year as a true perennial in regions where summers are not humid and hot. In other words this is more of an annual in the South. The creamy flowers are fragrant, too !
Primula 'Drumcliff'

Primula 'Drumcliff'

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$6.95   A dark leaved primrose with creamy pink flowers, 'Drumcliff' is very cold tolerant, surviving to +5°F. Height of 4 to 6 inches. Both spring and autumn blooming. And even during winter in the South.
Primula 'Innisfree'

Primula 'Innisfree'

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$6.95   Primula 'Innisfree' has rich, red flowers above darkly tinted leaves. It blooms both in spring, and in the fall season as the weather becomes cooler. It is especially cold tolerant, also being longer lived than the type of primroses usually offered in garden centers.

Innisfree is a small island on a lake, Lough Gill, near to and just southeast of the small city of Sligo, Ireland, featured in a Yeats poem,

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made;
Nine bean rows will I have there, a hive for the honeybee,
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

Primula 'Lilian Harvey'

Primula 'Lilian Harvey'

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$6.95   Lovely double fuschia-pink blossoms, flowering from March to May. She grows six to eight inches tall and six to ten inches wide. The person, Lilian Harvey (1906 - 1968), was a German-British actress and singer. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 8, also to zone 5 with protection, and to zone 9 along the West Coast.
Primula 'Mark Viette'

Primula 'Mark Viette'

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$6.95   This primrose starts out purple when it is in bud, and even as the flower opens it is still purplish. Only gradually does it turn to ruffled, double flowers of hot pink, a pink leaning towards violet, with a pencil-line edging of cream. As with other primroses, 'Mark Viette' grows best in ground that is lightly moist, and in partial shade. Dividing plants of it every couple of years is recommended to keep the plants healthy and blooming well. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 8, also to zone 5 with protection, and to coastal areas of zone 9.
Primula 'Belarina Nectarine'

Primula 'Nectarine'

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$6.95   'Nectarine' is a more unusual color in a double flower, a combination of light and darker yellow and orange. Hardy in USDA zones 6 - 9, zone 5 with protection.
Primula 'Penumbra'

Primula 'Penumbra'

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$6.95   Multicolored flowers of black with a wide white edging and golden eyes are showy and very bright. The flowers come in clusters atop four-inch stems in spring and again in fall. The leaves are light green and can be evergreen depending on the severity of the winter. USDA zones 6 to 9, to zone 5 with protection. With good snow cover it is routinely carried over winter in zones 3 and 4.
Primula 'Petticoat'

Primula 'Petticoat'

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$6.95   Cluster of ruffled, double pure-white flowers show in spring and again during the cooler days of autumn. USDA zones 6 - 8. Longer lived where summer weather is not hot and humid.
Primula 'Quaker's Bonnet'

Primula 'Quaker's Bonnet'

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$6.95   ‘Quaker's Bonnet’ is a very early bloomer, with clear mauve-purple flowers. We suggest dividing it every two or three years, in early fall. Also known as 'Lilacena Plena,' this old primrose was one of the original double varieties used by Florence Bellis in her breeding program. USDA zones 4 - 8, and to zone 9 on the West Coast.
Primula 'Red Ruffles'

Primula 'Red Ruffles'

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$6.95   These bright red flowers are double with white striping or speckling along the edges. Where winters are mild enough this will begin blooming during the cooler days of fall, and continue on blooming through winter, on into spring. Height is 4 to 6 inches. Cold hardy in USDA zones 6 - 9. This plant perfers a humus-rich soil that doesn't dry out too much. And dappled light or partial sun.
Primula 'Sue Jervis'

Primula 'Sue Jervis'

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$6.95   Flowers of light, candy pink are double. As a flower ages, her petals lighten to a creamy pink. For growing conditions, dappled shade and damp but well-drained soil is recommended. To encourage vigorous growth and prolific flowering, dividing the double primroses every year or two is best, and adding some compost or organic fertilizer to the soil.
Primula 'Tie Dye'

Primula 'Tie Dye'

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$6.95   With large blue and white flowers, the name of this primrose is appropriate for its unique look. Four-inch high stems carry clusters of flowers in spring and again in autumn. The leaves are light green and can be evergreen depending on the severity of the winter. USDA zones 6 to 9, to zone 5 with protection, and even to zone 3.
Primula 'Belarina Valentine'

Primula 'Valentine'

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$6.95   The richly red color of this primrose brings to mind the red roses that are so popular for Valentine's Day. This double flower is a similar red. USDA zones 6 - 8, and zone 5 with protection.
Primula sieboldii 'Snowflake'

Primula sieboldii 'Snowflake'

$9.95   Blooming from early April to late May, the pure white flowers of 'Snowflake' have lacey margins. The flowers come in clusters on stems up to about nine inches high. It doesn't like too much direct sunlight, but thrives in filtered shade. A humusy soil that is rich in leaf mold is much to its liking. Don't be surprised to see it going dormant early, before the end of summer. This is normal for it and doesn't mean that it won't return to be bigger and better the following year. We advise you to make a note of where it's planted so that you won't lose track. Slowly growing into a clump, it also will spread wider into a colony. It may even migrate short distances because new plants can form on its spreading roots. Hardy in USDA zones 5 - 8 (and to Zone 9 along the coastal regions of the West).
Rhodanthemum hosmariensis

Rhodanthemum hosmariensis

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$7.95   (roe-'dan-the-mum) Originally from Morocco, this is a superb flower and foliage plant for a sunny site, with pristine white daisies that is seldom without bloom from spring to autumn. In milder parts of California it even flowers through winter. The silvery leaves are evergreen and attractive at all seasons. Reaches a size of 8 to 10 inches high, by 24 inches wide. Give it ground that drains well. Otherwise, very low-maintenance and easy to grow. Especially nice when added to a large container of sun-loving flowers. Also it is attractive drapping over a rock wall or as an edging plant, among other possibilites. Tolerates drought very well. Hardy to +15°F.
Rosa 'Clementina Carbonieri'

Rosa 'Clementina Carbonieri'

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$9.95   A tea rose, this lovely, low bush has fragrant ever-blooming flowers of pink, with the reverse sides of the petals painted in yellow and salmon. Its height is approximately three feet tall, with a two-foot width. And it has few thorns. First registered in 1913. Cold hardy to 0°F.
Rosa rubrifolia

Rosa glauca (rubrifolia)

$9.95   Also known as Rosa rubrifolia, it is notable for its unusual grey-green foliage and purplish-red stems. Flowers are pink and about one inch wide. The clusters of small red fruit are colorful later in the year. Rosa glauca is a densely spreading bush, 5 to 6 feet tall. Its thorns are small, more like prickles. Native to mountains of southern Europe, it can take much cold, growing in USDA zones 2 to 9. Good uses would be grown as a free-standing shrub, or tied to a trellis or fence to be trained as a small climber. Doesn't need much sunlight to grow well, growing well in a semi-shady spot in your garden. Disease resistant and undemanding. Its fruit pesists into winter to offer food for birds.
Rosa 'Mutabilis'

Rosa 'Mutabilis'

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$9.95   Flowering all summer long, this semi-evergreen shrub rose grows to four feet tall in northern climates and to six feet tall in southern climates. Young shoots are purplish and the new leaves are coppery. Its flowers change color as they age — the unopened buds are apricot-pink, then open to buff, next becoming a mixture of apricot, rose, and crimson. The flowers are unscented and each is two to three inches across. Sometimes called the butterfly rose, it was brought back from China during the Victorian era. Do not prune it hard, but only enough to keep it within bounds or to remove dead wood. Winter hardy to USDA zone 6.
Ruschia pulvinaris

Ruschia pulvinaris

$6.95   Closely related to iceplants, Ruschia comes from high elevations in South Africa and is said to survive outdoors where winter temperatures drop to -10°F. The foliage is a tight mass of evergreen leaves. The shocking pink flowers bloom for several weeks in late spring. It grows about three inches tall and expands to a foot wide or more. Our plants are propagated by cuttings so the flower color will match the color in our photo. As it loves heat, it is a good choice for especially hot locations. To survive a cold winter, it needs time to settle in, so plant it in early summer rather than towards summer's end.
Salvia africana-lutea

Salvia africana-lutea

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$6.95   The leaves are wavy, aromatic and tinted a grayish-green. The large 1 to 1½-inch flower has a rich and unusual color of warm chocolatey brown. It also has an attractive largish cup-shaped purplish calyx after the petals fall off . The flowerbud starts a lighter color but soon changes to brown. Generally 2 - 3 ft tall, to 6 ft in parts of CA. Native to Africa, where it is known as dune sage. Grows well in USDA zones 9 - 11.
spreading Saxifraga x urbium 'Aureopunctata'

Saxifraga x urbium
'Aureopunctata'

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$8.95   A low, spreading perennial for growing in partial to full shade, the leaves of this are spoon-shaped of dark green with serrated edges, and speckled in golden-yellow. It needs little water to be content, and in time will spread to form a thick groundcover, even on poor soil. In late spring, small whitish-pink flowers show on stems of eight to fifteen inches. Commonly known in Britain as “London Pride” because it is so frequently seen in that city. For USDA zones 6 - 8 this is one of the best all-purpose edging plants for shade. In autumn, be sure to keep fallen leaves from completely covering and potentially smothering the plant.
Saxifraga stolonifera 'Cuscutiformis'

Saxifraga stolonifera
'Cuscutiformis'

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$6.95   'Cuscutiformis' has rounded green leaves that are shallowly lobed, and covered with a netting of creamy veins. In spring several red, thin and thread-like runners spring from a plant that end in smaller baby-plants that will root in and grow on. In this way several plants become a widening colony. A good place to grow this would be under large shrubs, or on the densely shady, mossy side of a building where little else is able grow. Airy clusters of small white flowers appear on thin stems in late spring. USDA zones 5 - 9.
Saxifraga stolonifera 'Harvest Moon'

Saxifraga stolonifera
'Harvest Moon'

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$9.95   'Harvest Moon' prefers more shade than sun, however if grown in too much shade the leaves will be more green than golden. So a fair degree of bright sunlight is necessary. You will notice that the higher, more exposed leaves will be more golden, whereas the lower, more shaded leaves will be darker and greener. It has tiny white flowers on stems twelve to fifteen inches tall in late spring to early summer. Despite the fact that it does spread by runners, it is one of the easiest plants to keep under control because the plants are so often delicately rooted into the ground. It tolerates dry gound well, and would be a good choice for a groundcover in dry shade. When grown in a pot let the soil dry out considerably more than you would most potted plants. When grown in a pot, if its soil is kept constantly wet, the roots will rot. USDA zones 5 - 9. This plant thrives on neglect.
Saxifraga stolonifera 'Maroon Beauty'

Saxifraga stolonifera
'Maroon Beauty'

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$6.95   Having rounded leaves of very dark green under ideal conditions, the dark leaves contrast well with their lighter veins, and are lightly covered in hairs that show off to good advantage. The undersides of the leaves are pinkish. Grows best in mostly shady conditions although some light is needed for the richest coloring of reddish-green. Spreads by thin runners. Dainty, light and airy flowers appear in spring on stems of about twelve inches tall. USDA zones 5 - 9.
Saxifraga stolonifera 'Tricolor'

Saxifraga stolonifera
'Tricolor'

$9.95   Lightly hairy evergreen leaves are edged in cream with pink highlights. This perennial is hardy from USDA zones 5 to 9. One of its common names is mother of thousands, referring to the many baby plants that will grow from it on runners. Although others recommend growing it in moist but well drained soil, our experience suggests that is it better to let the soil dry out considerably between infrequent waterings. The rocky cliffs of Japan and China are its native home. Delicate clusters of small white flowers rise to 15 inches in spring into summer. Limited quantity.
Sempervivum 'Silver Olympic'

Sempervivum, cold-hardy succulents -- to go to a separate page offering them, click here.

Silene alpestris 'Flore Pleno'

Silene alpestris 'Flore Pleno'

$7.95   With flower stems to a height of twelve to fifteen inches, open clusters of fringed, semi-double, pure white flowers that are ¾-inch wide, continue non-stop all summer long, even into cold fall weather. Its leaves are evergreen, and grow as a low, ground-hugging clump. Hardy to USDA Zones 4 - 8. Its soil needs to be well drained. One of the longest blooming perennials.
Tanacetum haradjanii

Tanacetum haradjanii

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$7.95   Deeply cut, feathery leaves of silvery white are stunning on this perennial. We rarely if ever see flowers on it. This likes well drained soil and more sun than shade. Winter hardy to USDA zone 6. Mature height will be six inches with a width of twelve inches in a couple of years.
Telekia speciosa

Telekia speciosa

$10.95   The scale of this easy-care perennial is large. The leaves are light green and big, to about a foot long. The height of the leaves will be two to three feet. Taller stems to five feet carry golden petalled flowers in summer that have particularly thin petals. For full sun or partial shade. Once established it does not require a lot of water. Also known as Buphthalmum speciosum. USDA zones 3 - 7 in the East, zones 3 - 9 in the West.
Tellima 'Forest Frost'

Tellima 'Forest Frost'

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$8.95   Known as fringe cups, this plant is semi-evergreen and cold hardy to USDA zone 5 (-20°F). The color of the leaves is green in summer and an amazingly bright red in winter. The height of the foliage will be a foot to a foot and a half, with taller green flowers that turn to red on stems to 30 inches. Does well in dry shade, also growing with more light.
Veronica gentianoides 'Variegata'

Veronica gentianoides 'Variegata'

$8.95   Its lustrous, green leaves have creamy marbling. It is semi-evergreen and low to the ground, growing into a slowly widening clump that carries short spires of beautifully blue flowers in early summer. To grow well it needs soil that will not dry out during the heat of summer. And filtered light, or placed where it receives morning sun only. USDA zones 4 - 9 in the West, zones 4 - 7 in the East.
Viola odorata 'Clive Groves'

Viola odorata 'Clive Groves'

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$8.95   Its small, sweetly fragrant flowers bloom very early in the year. The scent is strong and you do not have to wonder if your sniffer is working with this flower. The color is a deep, rich purple. A plant of this will send out short runners that become new plants. And within a season or two, one plant becomes a small colony.
Viola odorata 'Fair Oaks'

Viola odorata 'Fair Oaks'

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$8.95   Introduced by Canyon Creek Nursery in 1986, to quote their catalog, “originating in the garden of my family home, the color of this violet, unlike any other, is a delicate shade of lilac-pink. The medium sized flowers on long stems are extremely fragrant. The seeds come true and spread very rapidly making a nice woodland ground cover.” USDA zones 3 - 9.
Viola odorata 'Lianne'

Viola odorata 'Lianne'

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$8.95   The small flowers are purplish-bluish. This viola will spread wider in two ways, both by seeding itself about and also from runners that it sends out four to eight inches. It does not grow tall, reaching a short height of 2 - 4 inches.
Viola odorata 'Lydia Groves'

Viola odorata 'Lydia Groves'

$8.95   The flowers of this are a light, candy pink that are sweetly scented. In 1989 it was selected in England by Clive Groves and named for his mother. The flowers have a single row of petals. The heart of the flower is a creamy white. It blooms very early in spring and again in fall. Its height is three to six inches.
Viola odorata 'Lydia's Lark'

Viola odorata 'Lydia's Lark'

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$9.95   This is a seedling of 'Lydia Groves,' that's a darker pink, with a bit of lavender-purple on the reverse side of the petals. The heart of the flower is a creamy white. It blooms in early spring and again in fall, with a height of three to six inches. Sweetly fragrant.
Viola odorata (mauve)

Viola odorata (mauve)

$8.95   This flower is a grayish violet, very fragrant and low growing. It blooms early in the year, and often will rebloom as the days become cooler at the end of summer. Light shade is recommended. Adding some well rotted compost when planting is helpful. Young plants should be watered regularly to get them off to a good start. Once established, plants do not need more than average moisture. USDA zones 3 - 9. Sweet violets have been cultivated in gardens for a long time, not only for their beauty and fragrance, but also for their medicinal properties. They contain the glycoside of salicylic acid, which has been used for the synthesis of aspirin. It is no wonder herbalists have prescribed an infusion of this plant for treating headaches, migraines and insomnia.
Viola odorata 'Reid's Crimson Carpet'

Viola odorata 'Reid's Crimson Carpet'

sorry, sold out
$8.95   Introduced by Canyon Creek Nursery in 1998, to quote their catalog's description of 'Reid's Crimson Carpet,' “this makes a compact carpet of tidy, deep green foliage. In spring this mat is covered with brilliant crimson flowers which are nicely scented. Named for our son, Reid, who thinks we should have patented this violet to help towards his college fund. He might be right.”
Viola odorata ssp. sulfurea

Viola odorata ssp. sulfurea

sorry, sold out
$8.95   Our original plant of this came from Lamb Nurseries in Spokane, Washington. It has flowers of apricot with a single row of petals. For many years we thought this had no scent, although more recently we noticed a very light fragrance to a plant in flower in one of our greenhouses. According to Roy Coombs in his book, Violets, the History & Cultivation of Scented Violets, this is probably a distinct species rather than a subspecies of V. odorata. Dating from 1896 in France. USDA zones 3 - 9.
Viola odorata 'Duchesse de Parme'

Viola odorata 'Duchesse de Parme'

sorry, sold out
$11.95   'Duchesse de Parme' originated in 1870 and is said to be the easiest Parma violet to grow. In America it has been one of the easier Parmas to find in recent years. Its fully double flowers are a violet blue, with creamy white closer to the center. It makes a charming tussie mussie or petite bouquet, with its six-inch stems. Its season is late winter into early spring, and again in early fall. Survives cold down to about +20°F.
Viola odorata 'Mrs. David Lloyd George'

Viola odorata 'Mrs. David Lloyd George'

sorry, sold out
$19.95   A semi-double lavender flower with a center rosette of white, that is fragrant and with long stems. Limited quantity. This rare violet is named for Dame Margaret Lloyd George (1864 - 1941), who was a Welsh humanitarian and one of the first seven women magistrates appointed in Britain in 1919, and also the wife of a British Prime Minister. Survives winter's cold to about +20°F.
Viola 'Fiona'

Viola cornuta 'Fiona'

sorry, sold out
$8.95   These sweetly fragrant flowers are cream colored, with a delicate shading of pastel violet to the edges. This is known as a horned violet, that is perennial and grows as a low, mounding plant. Blooms appear in spring and into summer.